We’ve Moved!

Posted by on Thursday, October 16, 2014

Thanks so much for visiting us.

We have relocated the CampusClarity blog. We moved all our old posts, and  we will continue to keep you up-to-date on the latest compliance and prevention stories at the new site. (Sadly, we will no longer be updating this blog.)

We have also redesigned our website, making it easier for you to be a part of the Talk About It Community, where you can download a variety of free materials, including posters, workshops, and hand-outs designed to combat sexual violence and substance abuse on your campus

We hope to see you there!

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on <a class=Read More

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Weekly Roundup

Posted by on Friday, October 10, 2014

For this week’s roundup we have three developments in higher education law you should be following.

Clery Reports Reveal Dramatic Increase in Reported Sexual Assaults

Last week schools across the country released their Clery Annual Security Reports, which include statistics on the number of reported sexual assaults occurring on or near campus. This year’s batch of Security Reports reveals a dramatic increase in the number of reported sexual assaults at America’s top 25 colleges and universities. Perhaps counterintuitively, the increase in reported assaults is good news for activists and others trying to combat the epidemic of sexual violence on American campuses.  Historically, sexual assaults have been under reported  meaning that many victims did not receive the help they needed to recover. Activists believe that the increased number of assaults being reported is a positive result of the increased awareness around the issue in the last several years. Victim/survivors of sexual assault Read More

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Ten Free Resources on Bystander Intervention

Posted by on Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Bystander Intervention has received a lot of attention from educators and advocates in the last few years. The most recent guidance from the Department of Education about Title IX recommends that schools provide training to students on “strategies and skills for bystanders to intervene to prevent possible sexual violence.” The White House’s first report on campus sexual violence pointed to bystander intervention as a “promising prevention strategy” that schools should be implementing on their campuses.

Fortunately, there are already numerous resources available to schools to begin developing their own bystander training. Alongside the White House’s report, the CDC released a document outlining what’s involved in building a bystander program. It provides a great starting point. Below are some more resources you can use to educate trainers about how to teach bystander intervention as well Read More

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

“A Leadership Role”: Interview with Peter Novak [Part 3 of 3]

Posted by on Monday, October 6, 2014

In our last installment from CampusClarity’s interview with Peter Novak, he discusses how colleges and universities can take a leadership role in stopping sexual misconduct and substance abuse by setting goals that may at first seem counter-intuitive.

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Weekly Roundup

Posted by on Friday, October 3, 2014

For this week’s roundup we return to oft-discussed but important theme of what role fraternities do and should be playing in the campus sexual assault crisis.

No, Fraternities’ Biggest Problem is Not Drunk Women

Last week Forbes published a thought piece by one Bill Frezza, president of the alumni house corporation for MIT fraternity Chi Phi Beta. Between Frezza’s troubling title, “Drunk Female Guests Are the Gravest Threat to Fraternities,” and the disturbing allegation that intoxicated women are the cause of sexual assault, as opposed to the men who assault them, the piece came in for its well-deserved share of criticism, and was eventually pulled by Forbes. In this opinion piece, Time Magazine does an excellent job demonstrating that fraternities are in fact their own biggest problem, pointing to the high number of hazing-related deaths (events that involve no women, drunk or otherwise), the well-documented plague of binge-drinking that afflicts frat Read More

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

California’s New Consent Law: Yes Means Yes vs. No Means No

Posted by on Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Once again, California is at the forefront of addressing a difficult societal problem with a controversial new law. In February, State Senators Kevin de Leon and Hannah-Beth Jackson introduced SB 967 into the California Senate. The bill sought to establish a standard of affirmative consent (or “yes means yes”) at colleges and universities across the state.

In their op-ed, Gloria Steinem and Michael Kimmel call the “yes means yes” consent standard in California’s Senate Bill 967 a “welcome game-changer in understanding and preventing sexual assault.” They argue that replacing the “no means no” standard erases the presumption, “Unless one hears an explicit “no,” consent is implied.”

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) says SB 967 “would render a great deal of legal sexual activity into ‘sexual assault’ and imperil the futures of all students across California.” FIRE argues there is “no practical, fair, or consistent way” to Read More

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

“Survivor-Centered”: Interview with Peter Novak [Part 2 of 3]

Posted by on Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In this second excerpt from CampusClarity’s interview with Peter Novak, he discusses the value of clear, coordinated, and survivor-centered policies and reporting procedures in dealing with issues of sexual misconduct on campus, and how the support of survivors is intrinsic to the goals of Title IX.

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Weekly Roundup

Posted by on Friday, September 26, 2014

For this week’s roundup we’re going to look at how co-ed frats, millennial marketing strategies, and survivors who refused to be silent are challenging rape culture on campus.

Wesleyan Forces Frats to Admit Women

Back in May we brought you this story about a proposed policy change at Wesleyan University. After a number of high-profile sexual assault scandals, many of them involving fraternities, the school considered mandating that fraternities begin accepting female members. Now, that policy has been implemented, and Wesleyan frats will have three years to start letting in women. The reaction from students and alumni will presumably be mixed, but at least some have already taken to Twitter hailing the change and the changes they expect it to bring to fraternity culture at Wesleyan.

The Ad Agency behind “It’s On Us”

Last week President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden unveiled the new anti-sexual assault Read More

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Interview with USF Vice Provost Peter Novak [Part 1 of 3]

Posted by on Wednesday, September 24, 2014

CampusClarity recently interviewed Peter Novak, Vice Provost of Student Life at the University of San Francisco, about Student Life’s harm-prevention programming this Fall. The interview sheds light on how one school is approaching these important issues.  We’ll be publishing the interview in three installments this week.

In this excerpt from that interview, Vice Provost Novak discusses how to use data collected by “Think About It” along with elements and themes from the course as a basis for expanded programming on sexual violence and substance abuse on campus.

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrRead More

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Weekly Roundup

Posted by on Friday, September 19, 2014

For this week’s roundup we have three stories about the latest in substance abuse and sexual violence prevention efforts.

New White House Campaign Enlists Men in the Fight against Sexual Assault

Today President Obama and Vice President Biden announced a new campaign intended to encourage bystander intervention preventing sexual assault on college campuses. The campaign, called “It’s On Us,” is intended for all students, but is particularly focused on men. Research suggests that although the majority of college-aged men disapprove of sexual assault and sexual violence, they may be reluctant to speak out against it due to the mistaken belief that their peers will disagree. “It’s On Us” will attempt to dispel that belief. The campaign will be promoted on its website, social media and through partnerships with colleges, organizations, and private parties.

University of California Announces Plans to Take Action on Sexual Assault

In June, Read More

Talk About It!Share on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone